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Alison Lapper

(Tài liệu chưa được thẩm định)
Nguồn: Đỗ Mạnh Hà sưu tầm
Người gửi: Đỗ Mạnh Hà (trang riêng)
Ngày gửi: 10h:20' 14-11-2008
Dung lượng: 13.7 MB
Số lượt tải: 4
Mô tả:

Alison Lapper

Voice 1
Hello. I’m Elizabeth Lickiss.
Voice 2
And I’m Marina Santee. Welcome to Spotlight. This programme uses a special English method of broadcasting. It is easier for people to understand, no matter where in the world they live.
Voice 3
‘Why shouldn’t my body be art?’
Voice 1
Alison Lapper asked this question. Alison’s body does not fit into the world’s idea of what is ‘normal’. People have asked - ‘why should she consider her body to be art?’ Alison says. ‘Why not?’ Alison’s body looks different to other people’s. And this is exactly why artist Marc Quinn wanted to make a statue of her.
Voice 2
Marc made a statue of Alison’s body with white marble stone. It now stands in a very important place in London. It is in the fourth corner of Trafalgar Square. The other three corners have permanent statues. But the fourth corner has its statue changed every year or two. In September 2005, Marc Quinn’s statue was placed in the fourth corner. The statue is called, ‘Alison Lapper Pregnant.’ So who is Alison Lapper? And what is her story?
Voice 1
Alison was born in April 1965. When Alison was born, doctors quickly took her from her mother. They hurried around. Her mother wondered what was happening. Where was the baby? Then, a cleaner said, ‘Can you hear all that noise? A baby’s just been born. She has no arms or legs. It is a horrible looking thing. The doctors say she will probably die in a day or two.’
Voice 2
Alison’s mother did not know then that they were talking about her baby. She spoke to her doctor. He told her that it would be best if the state looked after her baby. She should get on with her life. Later, Alison said,
Voice 3
‘And so there I was. Alison Lapper - aged one week. I had no arms. My legs had no knees, just the thighbone ending in my feet. They were not quite right either. My condition was phocomelia. The Internet Medical Dictionary describes it as, “A birth defect, where the hands and feet are attached to abbreviated (shortened) arms and legs.” No one knew the cause of phocomelia. I was considered, "severely disabled." I really hate that term.’
Voice 1
Alison spent her childhood in a children’s home. There were about two hundred and fifty [250] children there. Some had mental difficulties. Others had physical problems. Alison spent many unhappy years in the children’s home. Some of the workers treated the children very badly - causing them mental and physical pain.
Voice 2
When Alison was eleven years old, her life improved. She moved to a different part of the children’s home. Here, the children were in small groups. Each group had a woman who acted as the children’s mother. They wanted to make it more of a family atmosphere. But Alison said,
Voice 3
‘These days, the children’s home is a friendlier place. The children are well cared for. However, for us it was too little too late.’
Voice 2
Alison left the home at the age of sixteen [16]. She moved to a training centre for young people. Here, she learned the necessary skills to live alone. And, at the age of nineteen [19] she moved to a home of her own in London. She said,
Voice 3
‘I became a carefree person. I enjoyed the discoveries of each new day. It was as if I had been set free from prison’.
Voice 2
Alison continued with her art education. She was clearly skilled and gifted. At Art College she enjoyed painting life-size pictures. One day, one of her art teachers looked at her work. She commented,
Voice 4
‘I think you paint all these pictures of beautiful people because you do not want to deal with how you look - who you really are.’
Voice 1
At first, Alison was shocked and hurt. But then she began to think about her teacher’s words. She said,
Voice 3
‘It was true. I had never really looked deeply at who I was. Maybe she had made me see something that was very important.’
Voice 2
Alison remembers looking through some art books one day. One of the books fell open at a picture of the ancient Greek statue, Venus de Milo. The female statue is made from white marble stone. The woman has both arms missing. Alison began to look at her own body. She began to think about how she, and others, felt about her.
Voice 1
For the first time, Alison made images of herself. She sat in her art room and examined the images. She said,
Voice 3
‘I thought, “Yes you are different. But you are not that different. You look pretty good here girl.”’
Voice 2
Alison left university in 1993. She used the money from her art to buy a house. Life was good. Two big events then changed her life again.
Voice 1
The first event was an art gallery asked to show her work.
Voice 2
The second big event was that Alison became pregnant. Her pictures included images of her body, without clothes. She hoped the pictures would help able-bodied people to accept the way she looked. She said,
Voice 3
‘I wanted people to maybe experience the idea that disability could be artistic - and even beautiful.’
Voice 1
Artist Marc Quinn seemed to share Alison’s hopes. He contacted Alison in 1999. He wanted to make a sculpture, a kind of statue, of her body. Alison laughed. She told him that she was nearly seven months pregnant. ‘That is even better,’ he said. So Alison agreed.
Voice 2
Marc Quinn’s sculpture of Alison is four point seven [4.7] metres high. It stands near to the statue of Nelson on his column in Trafalgar Square. Nelson is a hero because he won victory over the outside world. Some people say that Alison is also a hero. Her statue represents winning victory over your own situations. Alison has proved many critics wrong. She is a successful artist. And she is a successful mother. Her child is healthy and happy. One writer says that the statue represents overcoming the judgments of other people.
Voice 1
This strong message leads some people to say that the statue of Alison is not art. It is just a statue with a message. Alison disagrees. She says,
Voice 3
‘Anything that we are not at ease with, we avoid. But now I am up there - almost five metres high. You cannot avoid me any more. Why shouldn’t my body be art if Naomi Campbell’s is? People want things to be boring and safe. That is why the statue is causing debate.’
Voice 2
Whatever people say, Alison is pleased that they are saying something! The statue of Alison may make people question their own ideas about normality, art and beauty. But if it does, in Alison’s eyes, that is progress.
Voice 1
The writer and producer of today’s programme was Marina Santee. The voices you heard were from the United Kingdom, the United States and Canada. Computer users can hear our programmes on our website at www.radio.english.net. This programme is called, ‘Alison Lapper.’ Thank you for joining us today. Good-bye.
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